If I tell you to picture a successful entrepreneur – what comes to mind?

Most people think of the outliers, like Zuckerberg or Musk or Jobs, that never experience laziness because they’re the most memorable.

But they’re not what makes up the bulk of successful entrepreneurs – not by a long shot!

With every business-based Hollywood film further distorting our image of entrepreneurship, many people have lost touch…

What is takes to become a successful entrepreneur has never and will never change.

The numbers don’t lie.

Here’s a double-dose of infographic with the facts on what it takes to become a successful entrepreneur – you might be surprised!

What Makes A Successful Entrepreneur Infographic

*Sorry about the typos above, I’m working on getting them fixed!*

Anatomy of a Successful Entrepreneur Infographic

The one thing that really jumped out at me was that nearly half of all successful entrepreneurs weren’t even considering that path in college – I wouldn’t have guessed that!

Let me know what jumped out at you in the comments below – or share these bad boys around if you really want to help me out 😀

Either way, thanks for reading – hope you learned something valuable!

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Author

Avatar for Will Mitchell
Will Mitchell

Will Mitchell is a serial entrepreneur and Founder of StartupBros. You can learn more about him at the Startupbros about page. If you have any questions or comments for him, just send an email or leave a comment!

  • Avatar for James P James P says:

    Will,

    Writing from the UK. Came across your site an hour ago and have been glued to it…great content and clarity; thank you. Interesting data on entrepreneurs and good to dispel the myth that you need to be at college, have a Eureka moment about a social media app, then get a valuation in the billions without ever making a profit or generating revenue (dot com anyone)! As an almost 40 year old leaving the corporate world to start a first business the data is reassuring. Well done to those college students, good to see there are many other profiles starting and running their own companies.

    • Avatar for David Eberhart David Eberhart says:

      James,

      Glad to hear you’re joining the revolution! If we can help you out in your path to entrepreneurship, let us know. Check us out at startupssimplified.com. We’re no StartupBros yet, but we’re out here and wanting to help other entrepreneurs just like us make their dreams come true!

  • This has got to be the best infographic on starting up that I’ve come across so far. A brilliant gist of every thing a potential business owner should know!

  • Avatar for Senator Club Senator Club says:

    Willll this must have taken forever to create. So many data points!! Thanks man.

    Ian

  • Avatar for Phillip Phillip says:

    Hi – Thank for your post. I’m just wondering where you got the data. If possible, can you share with me the dataset(s)? Thanks – Phillip –

  • Excellent article! I grew tired of the company I worked for and decided to file for a US Patent. I knew NOTHING about the process – only that I had something that would be used by millions of people. I fought and battled against the USPTO (US Patent agency), proved I invented my idea, was first to invent, and got all the way to appeals. I was rejected twice, but found to have a unique, solely MY invention, but failed to be granted a Patent. However, I DID do it – had to research, take out 2nd mortgage, and I was all in. But, no Patent – yet.

    I discovered something about myself. I was afraid to fail, but afraid to NOT take the risk. Even though I didn’t get an approved Patent, I learned a LOT about myself – and other people. In my eyes, I failed. In the eyes of other people, I was BRAVE. Now, I waffled between “I failed” and “at least I tried!”, and I did get the recognition and I can still refile and try again – when ready.

    So, even though I didn’t get Patent approval, all my family and friends (and some others) see it as something THEY would be afraid to do. In that regard? I was successful. Even though I did not get the Patent (the entire process took SEVEN YEARS), I learned that failure is only a step that is necessary to see that nothing bad happens. So, I now see my attempt as a valuable lesson. I will probably refile with a different IP Attorney and will get a different Examiner. With the fear gone, I might even get the Patent next time. To be able to say “I tried and failed” is much better than to die, and have to say “I regret NOT trying” in something I believed in – now, I believe in myself. That, alone, was worth all the time, money, hope, and sleepless nights and it showed the world, really, that I believed in my idea enough to take action. No shame at all in trying – at least some headway was made and no amount of money can buy what I learned from this attempt. The process did provide me the opportunity (and paperwork) for another attempt as I removed the roadblocks of “proof” of invention, and this will allow me another try. Thanks for the very, very true words. To fail does NOT mean YOU are a failure – it only means that you are not afraid to fail !!

  • Love the infographics. Any chance you could post a PDF? We’d like to print a copy for our wall and the artifacts when printing the JPG make the designer in me long for a high-resolution version.
    Thanks so much!
    /Bradley
    Tarfoot.com

  • Avatar for Carmen Chavez Carmen Chavez says:

    You, sir, are awesome. Congrats on conquering your fears. I’m translating this and sharing it on my FB wall.

  • Avatar for sd sd says:

    I love the visuals!

  • Avatar for Pappi Pappi says:

    Great info Will, what jumped out at me was the average successful entrepreneur’s age 40. I honestly figured it would be in the low to mid 30s with all the discontent in the workplace now a days.

    I guess the industrial age philosophy is still going strong and it isn’t until most reach the 40 mark that they decides enough is enough and make the plunge.

    But at that age doesn’t the pre-entrepreneur mindset throw a huge mental block to pursue their dreams compared to a younger entrepreneur?

    What are your thoughts on overcoming the industrial age mindset during startup for that age group (40s)?

    You think they may need more than just a little HAPPY POWER to succeed?

  • Avatar for jerry enatalele jerry enatalele says:

    how can i be a good interpreneu rs in
    my business and out side

  • Avatar for StartupKnock StartupKnock says:

    Great content. Very useful.
    I like how you put in every small characteristics of a successful Entrepreneur.
    Continue the great work…..
    I have a similar post like this where i describe 40 interesting facts on Entrepreneurship. I will be grateful if it provides any benefit.

    Check it here:- https://www.startupknock.com/2018/09/40-unknown-facts-about-entrepreneurship.html

  • Avatar for Tom Tom says:

    Fantastic post.

    Really enjoyed reading it and it held my attention all the way through! Keep it up.